Welland History .ca

The TALES you probably never heard about

ELISHA C. TAYLOR

[Welland Tribune, 24 September 1897]

Elisha C. Taylor, who died at his residence in Pelham on Thursday evening, Sept. 16th inst., was born on the farm on which he resided all his life, and which was purchased by his father, John Taylor, from the Crown in 1790.The Taylor family were natives of Duchess county, New Jersey, and were members of the Society of Friends. They came to Canada as U.E. Loyalists-John Taylor referred to being at that time eighteen years of age.

Our subject, Elisha C. Taylor, was twice married. His first wife was Caroline Moore; his second, Hannah Cox of West Creek, N.J., who survives. Of his children eleven survive, and all were in attendance at the funeral. They are in order of age, as follows: _ Mrs. (Rev.) J.F. Barker, Hamilton; Mrs. Thomas Hill, Pelham; J. Bruce Taylor, Welland; A.E. Taylor, Niagara Falls; Mrs. (Dr.) Karn, Picton; L.H. Taylor, Niagara Falls; James B. Taylor, South Pelham; Mattie, at home; Mrs. Park Southworth, Pelham; and Charles and Alberta, at home. Until within a comparatively recent time Mr. Taylor was a strong, healthy man for his years, but last spring he suffered from lagrippe, and this was followed by jaundice, which proved fatal, after an illness of five months borne with true Christian patience and resignation. At the time of his death he was in the 74th year of his age. In politics Mr. Taylor was a pronounced Liberal, but always avoided rather than sought public office or position. In religious belief, like his forefathers, he was a consistent member of the Society of Friends.

The funeral took place on Sunday from his late residence at 10 a.m., services in friends’ meeting house, where Pastor William Rogers gave an appropriate address from the inspired and inspiring promise of holy writ, “I am the resurrection and the life.” William Wetherald also spoke in feeling and eloquent language of the deceased, whom he had known as warm friend for fifty years. The funeral was the largest ever held in that section of country, the community assembling on masse to testify their love and esteem for one so eminently deserving. The pall-bearers were the five sons of deceased, and Thomas Hill, the eldest son-in-law. The grandchildren present included Dr. Barker of the Johns Hopkins hospital, Baltimore, as well as all those living in this section. The floral offerings were profuse and indescribably beautiful. Among them were a pillow, the gift of the five sons; a sheaf and sickle, from A.E. and L.H. Taylor, and a wreath from Mrs. Frank Rounds, Welland.

Deceased was possessed of warm social qualities and a genial, sunshiny nature, as well as deep religious convictions; and his removal leaves a void in the community that will not be soon nor easily filled. But our loss is his gain. As the sequel of a well-spent life, death had for him no terrors, the grave no sting. In common with this community the TRIBUNE feels his loss as that of a friend, and tenders most sincere sympathy to those more immediately and deeply bereaved.

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