Welland History .ca

The TALES you probably never heard about

References for Dexter David Hoover

Hoover, Dexter Welland, Welland Tribune, Page 3, 09/02/1877

Hoover, Dexter Welland, Hometown, Page 64, 1959

Hoover, Dexter D. Souse: Wilson, Freddie F, Welland, Welland Tribune, Page 4, 14/12/1883

Hoover, Dexter David Welland, Rice’s, 1889, Biography.

Hoover, Dexter David, Spouse: Wilson, Freddie F., Welland, Wainfleet Genealogy, 04/09/1857

Hoover, Grant W. Welland, Welland Tribune, page 3, 11/06/1953

Hoover-dau, Welland, page 4, 02/07/1897, B

Hoover-son, Welland, page 1, 06/12/1898. B

Hoover, D.D. Welland, Welland Tribune, page 8, 26/02/1892

Hoover, D.D.  Welland, Welland Tribune, page 6, 23/11/1888

Hoover D.D.   Welland, Welland Centennial, page 64, 1958.

Hoover, Dexter, Welland, Welland Tribune, page 3, 26/09/1879

Hoover, Dexter, Welland, Welland Tribune, page 1, 30/10/1939, D

Hoover, Dexter, Welland, LHC Historic Dexter House, 1870

Hoover, Elias Grant Warren, Welland, Wainfleet Genealogy, 02/09/1885

Hoover, Frederika, spouse: Hoover, Dexter, Welland, Welland Tribune, page 3, 18/07/1938, D

Hoover, Frederika, spouse: Hoover, Dexter, Welland, Welland Tribune, page 6, 18/07/1938,D

Hoover, Frederika, spouse: Hoover, Dexter, Welland, Welland Tribune, page 3, 19/07/1938, D

Hoover, Grant, spouse: Sullivan, Maude, Niagara Falls NY, Welland Tribune, page 4, 27/08/1914, M

Dexter David Hoover (1857-1939)

[Compiled by S.]

Dexter David Hoover was the son of Elias and Minerva Guiline (Bradshaw) Hoover. Grandson of David Bradshaw of Pelham, one of the early pioneers of the county.

Dexter D, Hoover was born September 4, 1857 in Port Colborne. He married Frederica Frances Wilson, born March 26, 1859. She was the daughter of John Wilson and Mary( Hobson) Wilson, granddaughter of Robert Hobson, late sheriff of Welland. The marriage took place December 2, 1883 in Niagara Falls, New York.

They resided at 97 West Main St. Welland.

Dexter was involved in horse racing, also purchased the Dexter House and later was a grocer.

Dexter and Frederica Hoover had four children:

The first child was Elias Grant Warren Hoover born September 2, 1885 in Welland. Elias immigrated   to Buffalo about  1908 with his wife Maud.

Elias was a bartender in Buffalo. In 1920 he was listed as a steel inspector at a steel plant in Buffalo and by 1930 was an insurance agent in Buffalo.

Elias Grant and Maud Hoover had one child Charles E. Hoover.

The second child of  was Gretchen Hoover born August 7, 1889. She is located elsewhere on this website.

The third child of Dexter D. and Frederica was  Mary Gladys Hoover born July 1, 1897 in Welland.

Mary Gladys was a bank clerk. She married George Henry Bradshaw, born in 1891 in Stratford Ontario. He was an electrician.

They were married August 23, 1920 in Welland. He resided in Toronto and is buried at Woodlawn cemetery in Welland.

The fourth child of Dexter D. and Frederica was John Garcia Hoover, born December 2, 1898.

John Garcia died September 5, 1917 of spinal meningitis.

Dexter David Hoover (1857-1939)

[Compiled by S.]

Dexter David Hoover was the son of Elias and Minerva Guiline (Bradshaw) Hoover. Grandson of David Bradshaw of Pelham, one of the early pioneers of the county.

Dexter D, Hoover was born September 4, 1857 in Port Colborne. He married Frederica Frances Wilson, born March 26, 1859. She was the daughter of John Wilson and Mary( Hobson) Wilson, granddaughter of Robert Hobson, late sheriff of Welland. The marriage took place December 2, 1883 in Niagara Falls, New York.

They resided at 97 West Main St. Welland.

Dexter was involved in horse racing, also purchased the Dexter House and later was a grocer.

Dexter and Frederica Hoover had four children:

The first child was Elias Grant Warren Hoover born September 2, 1885 in Welland. Elias immigrated   to Buffalo about  1908 with his wife Maud.

Elias was a bartender in Buffalo. In 1920 he was listed as a steel inspector at a steel plant in Buffalo and by 1930 was an insurance agent in Buffalo.

Elias Grant and Maud Hoover had one child Charles E. Hoover.

The second child of  was Gretchen Hoover born August 7, 1889. She is located elsewhere on this website.

The third child of Dexter D. and Frederica was  Mary Gladys Hoover born July 1, 1897 in Welland.

Mary Gladys was a bank clerk. She married George Henry Bradshaw, born in 1891 in Stratford Ontario. He was an electrician.

They were married August 23, 1920 in Welland. He resided in Toronto and is buried at Woodlawn cemetery in Welland.

The fourth child of Dexter D. and Frederica was John Garcia Hoover, born December 2, 1898.

John Garcia died September 5, 1917 of spinal meningitis.

History of Federated Women’s Institutes of Ontario – PART ONE

Adelaide Hunter Hoodless (1857-1910)

The tragic death of her son, John Harold Hoodless, from drinking contaminated milk led her to campaign for clean milk in the city. She devoted herself to women’s causes especially improving education of women for motherhood and household management.

Eight years later, in 1897, Adelaide was invited to speak at a Farmer’s Institute Ladies Night in Stoney Creek, Ontario where she suggested the formation of an organization for rural women. The next week, the inaugural meeting of the Women’s Institute was held. The following week Adelaide Hunter Hoodless was named honorary president at the first formal meeting.

For the most part, however, Adelaide left the Women’s Institute in the capable hands of the rural women, while she continued her campaign for domestic science in towns and cities. Thanks to Adelaide, domestic science and sewing were added to the Hamilton school curriculum where she organized the training of domestic science teachers. She wrote the favoured textbook, ‘The Public School Domestic Science’, and became increasingly respected as an expert.

Later in her life, Adelaide Hunter Hoodless was to claim, “The education of women and girls has been my life’s work” and so it continued to be right up until the end. She died in February of 1910 of heart failure after speaking at a meeting at St Margaret’s College in Toronto, where she was appealing for a school of Household Science to be established at the university level.

One quotation, above all others, demonstrates the message from the founder of the Women’s Institute to all those women who have belonged to WI ever since: “What must be done is to develop to the fullest extent the two great social forces, education and organization, so as to secure for each individual the highest degree of advancement.”

Agnes Ethelwyn Wetherald (1857-1940)

During Ethelwyn’s stay at Union Springs Boarding School, New York, she experienced a Christmas which stayed in her memory all her life. In 1940 she shared it in a children’s column in the Welland Tribune. It is a real insight into how life was lived in the 1800s.

Christmas is supposed to be a call from Home Sweet Home, a strengthener and sweetener of domestic ties. Yet one of the pleasantest Christmas holiday seasons of my life was spent at a Friends’ Boarding School in Union Springs, on Cayuga Lake, New York State. Eight of us, five boys and three girls, being so far from home that the family purse refused to consider transportation charges, we were destined to spend the holidays together. The Friends’ idea being that the way to cure a person of wanting a thing extravagantly is to give it to him in reasonable amounts, there were none of us either boy crazy or girl mad. Sitting opposite to boys at meal time is a great destroyer of glamour and builder-up of companionableness. Miss Pope, the girls’ governess, who lived in the village and Elijah Cook the Principal, whose home joined the Seminary, were more than kind; but J.J. Thomas showed himself a super-man.As a trustee we were afraid of him; as a reprimander he was to be avoided. But now his great heart is moved to compassion. Poor little demons! So far away from home and mother! So brave and cheerful about it. Why, that girl from Canada had so sore a throat on Christmas Day, she was in the hospital wing, and could no more have eaten a slice of turkey than she could have chewed up her geography cover! Now, what to do about it? He goes into a huddle with himself and presently emerges with a radiant smile. This he conveys to the Girls’ Sitting Room, where are collected the homeless eight.

“How would you like to go somewhere?”

We are electrified. The writers of letters to home, drop their pens. The crocheters drop their crochet hooks. The checker players drop their boards. All eyes are on the speaker.

“You might drive my carryall to Blankley Quarterly Meeting next Seventh Day, and return that evening. No teacher would go with you; we can trust you.” He glances at my room-mate Mattie Williamson, who nods intelligently,(she later married a Methodist minister) and also at Daniel-I can’t recall his name, but a Daniel come to judgement could not be more impeccable. He is about to add the time worn “I am sure you will conduct yourselves in a way that will confer credit etc. etc.” but is overpowered by a chorus of young voices, exclaiming, rejoicing, delighting in anticipation. Not that we are crazy over Quarterly Meeting; but to go where we haven’t gone, see what we haven’t seen, do what we haven’t done—that is what youth desires.

As may be surmised, this carryall is not in the first heyday of youth. It is a large, top heavy vehicle, somewhat creaky in the joints and unsteady in the sinews, but otherwise still in the ring. Daniel the Dependable mounts to the driver’s seat. Mattie goes with him to do her back seat driving to advantage Three boys within try to sit by red headed Mate Moore, but Eddie and I see no one but each other. With a shout of acclaim we are off! The horses show signs of life, not to an indecorous extent, the intelligent brutes know they are going to Quarterly Meeting, but they are certainly in motion. Jiggetty jog, jiggetty jog; we laugh and sing and spare not! The wayfaring man in quiet country villages is accosted with: “Does your mother know you’re out?” the prevailing gag o the period. The fourteen miles of our pilgrimage are comfortably covered in less than three hours and we arrive in time for meeting, full of self importance.

A tall, wide, hospitable Friend and his fat and smiling wife were evidently apprised of our coming as they took us home with them to dinner. Never before or since have I been confronted with so large and thickly populated a dinner plate. On it reposed three large slices of turkey, two heaping tablespoons of dressing, the same of Irish potatoes mashed, ditto of sweet potatoes, ditto of creamed onions, ditto of mashed turnip, a large amount of cranberries, a sweet pickle and plenteous gravy poured profusely over all. Before seating ourselves our host inquired:”Which is the sick girl? This one? Fat as a match! Couldn’t eat her Christmas dinner hey? Well I’ll see she eats this one.” He seats me next t him. I blush as brightly as the red flannel bandage showing its edge so coyly among the white ruffles at my throat. Having lived on “milk-toast” three or four days, I am not afraid to eat, and my host’s hearty “Atta girl!” cheers me on. But at the advent of plum pudding, mince pie and pumpkin pie, enthusiasm wanes!

The short winter day draws quickly to a close. After a trip to the stables to inspect sheep, cows, ducks and chickens, we gather around the organ to sing with hearts and voices. Then we begin to talk of returning. But this we are not allowed to do without a parting lunch of doughnuts and cider. Eddie and I drive most of the way back and do not seriously imperil the lives of the party. We stop at a small hotel to “rest the horses.” One of them breathes heavily and the other shows signs of exhaustion. The boys treat us to soda water and we play games and start to dance. Oh that dance! If I live to be a thousand years old I could never forget it! Holding hard to your partner you went tum tumpty tum tum,(two steps to the left) and tumpty umpty, tum, tum (two steps to the right). Like the earth we have two motions; one on our axis, the other largely interfering with the axises(Goodness! What IS the plural?) We giggle and laugh, bubble and squeak. The landlord looks in, grinning from ear to ear from teeth to toes. Presently he reappears with a large tray bearing eight tall glasses of raspberry vinegar. This he observes grandly, is on the house.

So we all sit and sip and simmer down. Someone remarks that the horses having been watered have now regained their pristine vigour, and we promised J.J. not to be late. We resume our places in the carryall, Mattie and her Chosen One(was it Alf or Davy?) mount to the driver’s seat, and we move with conscious propriety through the quiet Main Street of Union Springs. Suddenly there is a jerk, a pause, a scraping, scrunching sound. Evidently something untoward has happened.We look  out to see the right front wheel moving gracefully away into the ditch, while a broken axle drags on the ground. We all alight, villagers gather around and advice is freely given. The horses are not alarmed. Probably this is not the first time they have been compulsory witnesses of a similar scene. After some consultation, four of us start on the uphill walk to the school. One boy remains to guard the horses and three are sent to explain to J.J. We feel sorry for the explainers but they report next day that the sterling old gentleman blamed no one but himself. One of nature’s nobleman was old J.J. Thomas.

Agnes Ethelwyn Wetherald (1857-1940)

Interesting Reminiscences Penned by Miss Wetherald.

The following reminiscences were written by Miss Wetherald and sent to John W. Garvin who included them in his foreword of Miss Wetherald’s bound volume of the 1931 edition of lyrics and sonnets.

As a child I was never robust enough to enjoy outdoor exercise, although I took pleasure in all-day excursions after wild raspberries among the hills of Rockwood, usually accompanied by several of our household. Large pails were brought back brimming with the perfumed fruit, which was “put down pound for pound”,(a pound of sugar to each pound of berries) to ensure freedom from mould.

Long walks through the woods, which never had enough mosquitoes to frighten me away were always a delight… I am very fond of countrylife; less enthusiastic over farm activities. I was seven years old when we left Rockwood. Hills and rocks, woods and the smell of cedars all come back in the name. (At the age of eight accompanied by my sister and three brothers, I watched the slow-moving train draped in black passing by the railroad station near Haverford College bearing the dead body of President Lincoln. The aura of intense grief, nation-wide, and the sorrowful face of my father, made a deep impression.

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Agnes Ethelwyn Wetherald (1857-1940)

{compiled by S}

In 1834 John Wetherald, a quaker, moved his family to Canada. He purchased a hundred acre farm near Guelph Ontario.

One son William was born in Healaugh, England on September 28, 1820. He attended Ackworth, one of the leading Quaker schools in England. He came to Canada and worked on the farm. Later he worked as a teacher. At age 23 he taught school in Ermosa Township. He was a gifted teacher.

In 1846 William Wetherald married Jemima Harris Balls born March 3, 1830 near Rockwood.

In 1851 William Wetherald started a boarding school for boys. It was called Rockwood Academy

Rockwood Academy: It housed up to fifty boys. The boys were ages 12-16. The main floor of the academy had a library, classroom, living room. The dining facilities were in the basement with a kitchen at the back. Upstairs the Wetherald family had five bedrooms and rooms for teaching assistants. The third floor was  dormitory rooms for students.

The school was solid. English, math and latin were taught. Expenses were low, twenty –one dollars for tuition and board for a term of three months. Most of the texts were furnished to the students.

Mr Wetherald was a gifted teacher and revelled in the poets and was close to his students.

Many of his students were accomplished, many became doctors, teachers, business men, ministry. J.J. Hill became a railway magnet, Premier A.S. Hardy, I.E. Bowman was leading educator of Waterloo, Alexander Campbell Public School Inspector of Bruce County.and Sir Adam Beck of Hydro.

In 1864 William Wetherald sold Rockwood Academy and by 1884 it closed.

The movie Agnes of God was filmed at the Rockwood Academy.

William Wetherald accepted a position at Haverford College in Philadelphia, moved his family there and stayed there until 1866. He resigned and moved to a farm in Pelham, Ontario. It was located the corner of Foss Road and Cream Street. He was welcomed by the Quaker community. William became the ordained minister at the Quaker church on Haist Street, Fonthill.

In May 1898 William went to England to attend an annual meeting of the Friends and spent several months in England. He was strickened with pneumonia and died there. He died in Banbury England in his 78th year.

His Son Herbert inherited the farm. William Jr and Agnes Ethelwyn lived there until their deaths.

Agnes Ethelwyn Wetherald was born April 26, 1857 in Rockwood. Her parents were William and Jemima Wetherald.  She was the 6th of eleven children.

She was a serious, lonely, frail child. She immersed herself in books. She was five feet five inches tall, slight stature, gentle unselfish person with an indomitable spirit.

When the family moved to Pelham, a Quaker family in Buffalo offered to educate one of William’s daughters, Agnes was chosen. She attended Union Springs school in New York and Pickering College in Ontario.

Her father believed women should have as good an education as men.

At age 17 Agnes received her first cheque for a poem that was published in “St Nicholas”. Starting in 1887 she contributed articles to Toronto Globe, also wrote regular columns for that paper.

Much of Ethelwyn’s work was done in her “Camp Shelbi” a large tree house built in the limbs of a willow tree at the Pelham Farm. It was built  March 1910.

Ethelwyn enjoyed politics and economics from both countries where she was educated.

Her first experience as a free lance writer, she was living with her 2 brothers in St Pail, Minnesota. She spent the summer at the lake , wrote about it and took it to the paper and was told it was a human interest story. It was published and she earned four dollars.

In the late 1930s Ethelwyn contributed to a column in the Welland Tribune. It was a children’s column written by Mrs S. McInnis using the pen name Patty Perkins. Ethelwyn used the pen name Octo, referring to the fact she was an octogenarian.

In 1938 July 16 Ethelwyn had a party. It was hosted by Louis Blake Duff at his home  in St. John’s.

In 1911 at the age of 54 Ethelwyn employed a woman named Mary who had a child. Ethelwyn adopted the child and named her Dorothy. Ethelwyn never married.

Agnes Ethelwyn Wetherald died March 10, 1940. At the time of her death much of her book collection was donated to the Rockwood Academy Collection at the University of Guelph.

  • Some of Agnes Ethelwyn Wetherald’s works:

The House of the Trees and other Poems, 1895

Tangled in Stars, 1902

The Radiant Road, 1902

The Last Robin; lyrics and Sonnets, 1907

Tree Top Mornings, 1921

Lyrics and Sonnets, 1931

An Algonquin Maiden: A Romance of the Early Days of Upper Canada with Graeme Mercer Adam, 1887

The Garden of the Heart: A Garland of verses by Ethelwyn Wetherald and others, 1903.