Welland History .ca

The TALES you probably never heard about

Gretchen Hoover Parsons (1889-1979)

[Compiled by S]

Gretchen was born August 7, 1889. Her parents were Dexter D. Hoover and Freddie F. Wilson. Dexter was a grocer in Welland. They lived at 97 West Main St. in Welland.

Gretchen attended Central school in Welland and the Welland High School.

Her grandfather was Elias Hoover (1823-1892). He was an early municipal councillor of the Village of Welland. He built the Dexter Hotel on Main St Welland.

Miss Gretchen Hoover entertained a number of young friends at her home on Tuesday night. The evening was spent in games, music etc. and a lunch was also served.


[Welland Tribune  February 19, 1904.]

Miss Gretchen Hoover entertained the T.W.S.C. on Wednesday evening. A very enjoyable time was spent by all present.


[Welland Tribune February 19, 1909]

Miss Gretchen Hoover entertained about thirty young friends on Friday evening last at progressive pedro and dancing. Favors were won by Miss Manie Brady and Mr Tom Bradley. Consolations going to Miss J. Chapman and M. Garner.


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FRANK ADLEY

FRANK ADLEY HAS CROSSED THE BAR

Much Respected Welland Man Dropped Dead at Brantford

[Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 21 March 1922]

The many friends of Frank Adley will very much regret to learn of his death, which took place very suddenly in Brantford on Sunday evening about 4 o’clock.

Mr. Adley had accompanied his daughter, Mrs. E. Clement to the railroad depot, she intending to return to her home at Niagara Falls. Mr. Adley had a sudden seizure and died almost immediately on the station platform.

Deceased was born in Welland and up until two years ago spent his whole life there. In his younger days he was an employee of the R. Morwood general store. He subsequently entered partnership with W. Dawdy and they succeeded Thomas Teskey in the general store where Perry’s book store is now.

Some two years ago he moved to Brantford where he was a commercial traveler to an oil company.

Besides his wife, deceased leaves two sons, Douglas and Harry, one daughter Mrs. Clement and his mother, Mrs. Adley, to mourn for him.

The late Mr. Adley was a well-known resident of the city. Of a quiet disposition he bore an exceedingly high name amongst all his friends.

DELOS DANIEL HOOKER

D.D. HOOKER DIED ON FRIDAY LAST

Held Mayor’s Chair of Town of Welland for Two Years.

[The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 22 August 1922]

An old and prominent citizen of the city was removed by the death on Friday, August 18th, of D.D. Hooker.

He had served two terms in the mayor’s chair of the Town of Welland; which he also represented in the county council, as reeve, and he had a number of terms in the town council to the credit of his public service.

He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and a Past Master of Merritt Lodge.

Born October 7th, 1853, near Middleport, Niagara County, the son of the late Thaddeus W. and Susan Seaman Hooker, he came to Welland as a young child with his parents.

At that time his father, who was a brick manufacturer at Middleport, had secured the contract for the bricks for the new court house and jail to be erected here for Welland County, and he came to Welland and established a brickyard to produce the material. The father was so well satisfied with the town that he located here permanently, continuing the brickyard business, to which the son succeeded in course of time and from which he retired in 1912. Mr. Hooker had not been engaged in any business since that time.

In 1914 he underwent an operation from the effects of which he never fully recovered and which was the ultimate cause of his decease.

He is survived by his wife, who was Miss Anna T. Waldron, and by one son, Edward D. Hooker, of this city, and three daughters, Mrs. S.H.J. Reid of Brantford, Mrs. William Fletcher of Worcester, Mass., and Miss Laura Hooker of Honolulu, Sandwich Islands.

A brother also survives, Frank W. Hooker of Selkirk, Man., and three sisters, Mrs. Walter Puttick of Hamilton, Mrs. Charles Snyder and Miss Ella Hooker of Welland.

A private funeral was held from the family home, 41 Maple avenue, Sunday afternoon.       In the absence from the city of Rev. J.D. Cunningham of the Presbyterian church, of which body Mr. Hooker was a member, the services were conducted by Rev. J.H. Wells of the Welland Methodist Church.

The bearers were David Ross, John H. Crow, C.H. Reilly, Charles Snyder, Daniel Konkle and S.H.J. Reid.

Interment was at Fonthill Cemetery.

*Note: Tombstone and death registration both say he died 19 August 1922.

ALICE AMANDA SWICK

[The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 12 December 1922]

Alice Amanda Swick, wife of Delbert Swick, a lifelong resident of this vicinity, died at her home, 171 South Main Street, on Saturday evening. She was 59 years of age.

The late Mrs. Swick had been sick for the past twelve months. She had suffered ill health for a number of years since the death of her son, William Carson. Death came, however, with startling suddenness, and was unexpected.

She was born at St. Anns, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Page, of Moulton. She was married on December 11th, 1879, at the Dunnville Methodist Church. After her marriage she resided with her husband at Wainfleet and afterwards at Welland Junction. From there she moved to her residence at Welland.

She is survived by her husband and one brother, Joseph of Moulton. Three sons, Hersey, Joseph and William Carson all predeceased her.

The funeral took place this afternoon at 2 o’clock from her late residence to Fonthill cemetery.

ROBERT A. BRADLEY

[The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 14 March 1922]

The death took place at his home, 25 McCormick Street on Sunday evening of Robert A. Bradley, beloved husband of Louise Bradley. Deceased, who was in his 55th year, had been ill since November last. On Friday last he had a turn for the worse and passed away on Sunday evening. Death was due from natural causes.

The late Mr. Bradley was born in Dunnville where he spent most of his life. He came to Welland about eighteen or twenty years ago. He was married at Dunnville to Miss Louise Gibson some thirty two years ago.

Besides his wife, deceased leaves three sons, Isaac, Roy and Maxie, all of Welland and one daughter, Mrs. Stence, also of Welland.

Deceased had for many years been a member of the Orange Lodge.

The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock. The pall-bearers will be brother members of the Lodge. The Rev. Mr. Wells will officiate. Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery.

Died: 12 March 1922

W. BRADLEY CHAMBERS

[The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 17 August 1922]

After an illness of only two weeks, the death took place last evening at his residence on East Main (606) of W. Bradley Chambers. Death was caused by heart trouble.

The late Mr. Chambers was seventy years of age. He was born in 1852 in Wainfleet, where he resided during the early part of his life. He moved to Welland when he was twenty-one years of age and took up business as a tinsmith in which capacity he became known not only in the city, but throughout the county. He continued his business until practically the time of his death.

Deceased was a member of the Methodist Church in Welland. He was also a member of the Masonic Order. He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Florence Campbell of Benton Harbor, Mich., and two sons, Raymond and Douglas of Welland.

The funeral is to be held tomorrow afternoon from the family residence at 3 o’clock. Interment will take place at Doan’s Ridge Cemetery. Rev. Mr. Wells will conduct the service.

Mr. Chambers was in business longer than any former man in Welland. His shop was formerly on West Main street. He built the building now occupied by H. Robinson, jeweler, and for a time conducted business in the store now tenanted by the Glass music people.

He was always deeply interested in municipal affairs and a number of years ago was elected to the Town Council, where he served for two years.

Died: 16 August 1922


ALFRED ROBERT DUNCAN

OLD RESIDENT DIED OUT WEST

Alfred Duncan, Formerly of Welland, Passed Away in Edmonton

[The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 2 May 1922]

David Ross has been notified of the death at Edmonton on April 20th of Alfred Robert Duncan, aged 55 years, a resident of Welland thirty years ago. For some time Mr. Duncan had been claims agent for the city, which post he was forced to give up in 1919 owing to an accident. He was struck by an automobile while crossing Jasper Avenue and never recovered. He is survived by his wife, one daughter and one brother, George William Duncan.

His father was George J. Duncan, who preceded the present incumbent, James Smith, in the office of Sheriff. Sheriff Duncan was a prominent merchant at what was then Drummondville, and a man of outstanding personality and character. He built up a large and prosperous business, and his course in life was marked by a multitude of kindly deeds.

Upon his assuming the shrivalty the Duncan family removed to Welland, occupying the house on East Main street now the residence of Registrar J.C. Crow. Alfred Duncan entered the employ of the Ross Company and was a well-known figure among the younger men of the town of that day.

W. BRADLEY CHAMBERS

[Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 17 August 1922]

After an illness of only two weeks, the death took place last evening at his residence on East Main (606) of W. Bradley Chambers. Death was caused by heart trouble.

The late Mr. Chambers was seventy years of age. He was born in 1852 in Wainfleet, where he resided during the early part of his life. He moved to Welland when he was twenty-one years of age and took up business as a tinsmith in which capacity he became known not only in the city, but throughout the county. He continued his business until practically the time of his death.

Deceased was a member of the Methodist Church in Welland. He was also a member of the Masonic Order. He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Florence Campbell of Benton Harbor, Mich., and two sons, Raymond and Douglas of Welland.

The funeral is to be held tomorrow afternoon from the family residence at 3 o’clock. Interment will take place at Doan’s Ridge Cemetery. Rev. Mr. Wells will conduct the service.

Mr. Chambers was in business longer than any former man in Welland. His shop was formerly on West Main street. He built the building now occupied by H. Robinson, jeweler, and for a time conducted business in the store now tenanted by the Glass music people.

He was always deeply interested in municipal affairs and a number of years ago was elected to the Town Council, where he served for two years.

Died: 16 August 1922


WHEN WILL WELLAND BE OLD?

[The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 27 July 1922]        

              Welland is a young city.

             “Quite obvious,” most citizens will rejoin.

             Yet why do we call the city young? When will it be old? Is the municipality to be in its youth, while the brick of its factories and public buildings reflect the recent touches of the workmen? Is it to be known as old, when these same buildings are darkened with age and weather beaten by the passages of time? Shall we say that London, Paris and Rome are old; that New York, Chicago and Montreal are middle aged; and that such places as Brantford, Niagara Falls, Chatham and Welland are young?

             Rather an interesting way to determine the age of a city is suggested in that last issue of the Christian Guardian, where Arthur Barner deals with old age and human beings. He says:

“Old age is a psychological, rather than a physical matter. The division is made in words, “Your young men shall see visions, your old men shall dream dreams.” If we can extend the period of vision until we cross the river, we shall never really grow old. The forward look keeps people young, in spite of physical ailment and weight of years.”

             What Mr. Barner says of men may well be applied to cities. Welland is not young merely because a few years have passed since its incorporation. It is in its youth because its citizens are planning for the future, because those who are at present guiding its destiny see visions of a larger, more useful community. Just so long as the future generations keep a vision of something better before them, so long will the city stay youthful and vigorous.

             May we never grow old!

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COUNTY COUNCIL OF THE COUNTY OF WELLAND

We have here a copy of the minutes of Welland County Council of nearly sixty years ago. They reveal two points of great interest. (1) The councillors sat in those days from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. (2) Owing to the county treasury being depleted, the warden paid accounts out of his own pocket.

[The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 23 March 1922]

Tuesday, Dec. 19, 1865

             The members of the County Council assembled today at the Court House and at Seven o’clock p.m. were called to order by the Warden, Edward Lee, Esq., when the following representatives answered to their names: M. Betts, Reeve of Welland, M. Climenhage, Reeve of Bertie, R. Coulter, Reeve of Thorold Township, N. Forsyth, Reeve of Fort Erie, Geo. Whiteman, Reeve of Humberstone, Thos. Greenwood, deputy Reeve, do., James Henderson, Reeve of Crowland,  W. James, Reeve of Thorold Village, W. Kennedy, deputy Reeve of Pelham, John Pew, Reeve of Stamford, N. Willick, Reeve of Willoughby.

             Absent Members: A.H. Biggar, Reeve of Clifton, Jos. Garner, Reeve of Pelham, Geo. Graham, deputy Reeve of Bertie, S. Haney, deputy Reeve of Thorold Township, J.C. Kirkpatrick, Reeve of Chippawa, W. Russell, deputy Reeve of Stamford.

Warden’s Address

             The Warden, addressing the Council, said he had deemed this the most favorable time to summon the Council to consider the municipal business of the County, and to close up as far as possible, the business of the year. He was not aware of any matters of great importance that would engage their attention, but if any should present itself, he would bring such under their notice. The Council, had, at the June Session, ordered an audit of the accounts from 1st January to the time Mr. Thompson vacated the Treasurer’s office. While he, the Warden, did not think it necessary to have such an audit, he considered it his duty to carry out the instructions of the Council. The audit had been made, and the report would be laid before the Council, and from which it would be seen that the statement did not agree with his settlement with the late Treasurer. Mr. Thompson has paid back to the County the sum of $246, paid himself for the report made by Gavin Robertson on the books of the County, as well as $200 paid himself as salary, not authorized by the Council. When the present Treasurer, Mr. McGlashan entered upon the duties of his office, he found but $102 in the Treasury and had the unpleasant fact staring him in the face, of debentures nearly due, interest maturing and accounts amounting to $500 for the liquidation of all of which he had no funds. Under the circumstances, he, the Warden, had assumed the responsibility of supplying such funds as were absolutely necessary to meet pressing demands. At one time, he had borrowed $5000; at another $5000, and on a third occasion he had himself advanced $300 to be repaid on the 1st January next, and at a rate of six per cent, (hear, hear) which he trusted would meet the approbation of the Council. In compliance with another resolution of the Council, a sale of County lands was held at Port Colborne on the 24th of October last, and which, while not well attended, not much sold, had realized good prices, exceeding the appraisement of the committee on County Lands. He was happy to inform the Council that during no year since 1855 had there been a greater quantity of Count Lands sold, than during the present one, and the prices also were in excess of those received hitherto. (Hear).  The quantity sold was 1971 acres, realizing $10,739-(Hear, hear) of which upwards of $2000 had been paid into the Treasury on the first installment. Much credit was due the County Clerk for the interest and good management he had evinced in the matter of the Lands. The Warden submitted a proposal from a Mr. Perry of Dunnville to forfeit the sum of $416.20 paid on 50 acres of County Lands, if the County would take back the land, as he was unable to redeem it. Mr. Dilly Coleman has written him, the Warden, asking for time in the payment of his arrears on County lands. He, the Warden, would earnestly recommend the payment of another investment on the amount due the government for the County Lands. The receipts from those lands would next year, exceed $3000, and he suggested the passing of a resolution authorizing the County Treasurer to pay as much as he could afford towards the liquidation of the original purchase. Since the last meeting of the Council he had received the resignation of the Rev. Charles Walker as Local Superintendent of Schools for the Township of Thorold. The School Act provides that in case of vacancy in these offices the Warden shall make new appointments. With the view of affording satisfaction in a nomination, he had consulted the Reeve of the Township who had recommended Mr. Issac P. Willson, who was accordingly appointed. The Warden then laid on the table a number of papers, among which were a circular from the Chief Superintendent of Education relative to the new Grammar School Act; a communication from the County Council of Simcoe, asking cooperation in urging upon the Legislature the adoption of the principle of free grants of public lands to actual settlers as being the only true one for a new country; a communication from the Council of the County of York on the subject of renewal of the Reciprocity Treaty. The Warden concluded by submitting a report from the County Clerk relative to the Bonds of Mr. McGlashan which had been all duly executed, and regretted the absence of so many Councillors, several of whom had been detained through illness.

Application for Extension of Time

             Mr. James submitted a petition from the collector of Thorold village praying for an extension of time to the 25th of January in the collection of the taxes of that village.

             Mr. Forsyth was under the impression that the local councils had in their own hands the power asked for.

             Mr. James read from the U.C. Consolidated Statutes page 672, Cap. 55, 22nd Vic, Section 104, to show that the local council had not the power to extend the time.

             Mr. Henderson desired to know if the council of Thorold would pay the interest on monies not paid as its apportionment to the County, if any such had remained unpaid since the 14th of the month.

             Mr. James said certainly. We ask no relief from the County, but merely time to collect, by which we shall avoid the disagreeable duty of distraining the goods of the people who were unable to pay up to the present time.

             Mr. D. D’Everardo, Clerk of the Council being asked for his opinion said that in a late case between the corporation of Kingston vs. Stevens, the Court held that so long as the poll remained in the hands of the Collector, that officer continued to be invested with all the powers vested in him.

             The prayer of the petition was finally granted on motion to Mr. James seconded by Mr. Forsyth.

Hours of Meeting

             On motion of Mr. Forsyth, seconded by Mr. James, the sessional hours during the present session were determined upon as follows: Meet at 9 a.m.; adjourn at 12.30 p.m., meet again at 2 p.m.; adjourn at 6 p.m.; meet again at 7 and adjourn at 9 p.m.

             The hour of adjournment having arrived, the Warden left the chair.